Thoughts On Cancer

I know there are many readers who have dealt with cancer in one way or another and I solicit your opinion on the following, short article:

Thoughts on John McCain’s Cancer Diagnosis and Why Death Positivity Needs To Reframe Cancer Talk.

This article is written by Caleb Wilde who writes “Confessions of a Funeral Director” Blog and soon to be published book.

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Caleb Wilde

I am curious as to  your thoughts about this article, please?

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About Ray V.

Living in Aiken, South Carolina, USA, I like to share what I am looking at, thinking about or listening to. I refer to this as the view out my window. Thanks for stopping by.
This entry was posted in On Cancer, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to Thoughts On Cancer

  1. Kurt Harden says:

    Well written and an important message. We actually “sell” treatment these days. We assume people will fight even late stage cancers when the appropriate response may simply be to enjoy our time. I still remember my father sitting in a hospital bed after it was clear that surgery and repeated treatment attempts were not going to knock out the progression of his bladder cancer. “If I would have known this,” he said. “I would have skipped the suffering of treatment and enjoyed myself.” He was dead serious. We need more messages like Caleb Wilde’s.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Victo Dolore says:

    When I heard the news and saw comments from people about “fighting” it, I thought to myself what if he decides not to treat it? I wouldn’t if I were in his position. Choosing not to “fight” is a courageous choice as much as treating aggressively, sometimes braver. Who really wins at cancer anyway? Not the patient.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Val Boyko says:

    Thanks for sharing this Ray. I do like the article and its message of accepting our mortality and finding a way to be at peace at the end. McCain’s cancer is not survivable. I haven’t heard anyone actually say that. When it comes to cancer, some are curable. Some are treatable. Some are not survivable. There is ongoing research, that can prolong life … but often at a high cost of pain and suffering in the horrors of the war zone.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. josiesvoice says:

    Getting a cancer diagnosis is never a pleasant experience. Our survival instincts come into play and life choices have to be made If it ever happened to me, I would explore all options, even going for a ketogenic diet. One of my followers here in WordPress happens to be an oncologist. She has very interesting articles about her research on this matter of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of metastatic cancer on a certain group of cancer patients. Her WordPress name is Ketooncologist @ketodoctor.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. An important message for all of us. When my father was diagnosed with cancer in 2002, it was already well advanced, and he initially didn’t want treatment. The rest of his family convinced him to try. He never left the hospital. He gave it his best, but he had some tough breaks due to complications the cancer caused in other organs. But he accepted his mortality, and kept his sense of humor. A visiting priest said to him, you never know how things might turn out; you might outlive me.” Dad replied, “I don’t think so, but I’ll put in a good word for you with the boss.”

    Liked by 2 people

  6. emjayandthem says:

    Great article that makes some very important points.
    My Mom said this all of her life and especially in her later and more frail years “I want to live till I die.” And she meant it. We discovered some issues in her latest years that could be treated but the treatment would have just about finished her – she opted out and guess what? She lived till she died.
    Wise words,
    MJ

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I cannot better the comments of emjayandthem. Well said all.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. My thoughts on living with a life after cancer. Was that kicking cancer ass was the easy part!! There is nothing one person can tell you about there journey through cancer that isnt the same.. we are all label right after as being healthy then get dismissed as being problematical when we complain.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I share real thought of my own side of cancer if you want to check out my page

    Liked by 1 person

  10. dawnwairimu says:

    cancer is such a scary diagnosis and can change your whole world in an instant. My brother was diagnosed with multiple myeloma and entered treatment. Thankfully he’s now in remission. But not everyone is so fortunate.

    Liked by 1 person

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